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GVieira said in July 23rd, 2014 at 6:09 pm

Actually, I write best when the TV is on in the background! Not normal TV but usually an excellent movie I’ve seen 700 times is ESSENTIAL to my brain being able to focus on pumping out words!

To each their own 😉

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admin said in July 23rd, 2014 at 6:24 pm

I wonder if it also has something to do with what we’re writing, and what demands it places on our thinking at the time?

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GVieira said in July 23rd, 2014 at 9:08 pm

Oh my! Implying that writing about chronic illnesses isn’t as taxing as writing about…whatever a Brit might choose?

Perhaps it’s just that some people’s minds work differently in different environments. I grew up in a busy, noisy household. Working in the peace and quiet is unnerving and distracting. I prefer familiar noise — such as a film I’ve seen 700 times — whether I’m writing the next War & Peace or a simple blog.

Regardless, to each their own.

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admin said in July 23rd, 2014 at 9:30 pm

Ouch! That’s not what I meant at all! Pretty much the opposite, actually! Your comment about background TV set me thinking about what goes on in our minds when we’re writing. At the moment, in fact, what I’m writing for First Time Author and First Time Publisher is only taxing in a very limited and specific way: I pretty much understand my material already, and it’s just a question of organizing the thoughts and making the language clear. Your comment made me stop and think that having a familiar film on in the background probably wouldn’t interfere all that much. And when it’s all said and done, I won’t think of what I’ve written as especially good writing, because it’s a fairly mechanical process. (And for the same reason, it’s not all that enjoyable.) At other times, I’m still struggling to understand or explore what I’m thinking even while I’m writing, and if things are going well, the mind makes all kinds of unexpected leaps into new ideas or new metaphors, or whatever. That’s much more taxing, to use youyr word, but it’s the taxation that makes it interesting and worthwhile. Yet under those circumstances I can’t stand any background noise–no, that’s not true. I can’t stand any background noise that includes words. Music doesn’t grab at my attention in the same way as words do. So what I meant by “what we’re writing, and what demands it places on our thinking at the time” was just me musing out loud at the strange process, or processes, that result in the composition of words and phrases. And as you say, it may have much more to do with attention–what catches our attention, or what we come to think of as normal background hum–than anything else.

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